Course Objectives - High School

Agriculture/Horticulture Department

Washington County Schools ensures equal access to all CTE courses; accessibility accommodations will be provided, if needed.

Agriculture Business Operations

The curriculum emphasizes off-farm agricultural occupations, business procedures, merchandising, marketing, and agricultural business management. Instruction is provided in agricultural product knowledge, agricultural mechanics, plant science, and leadership development.

Agriculture Mechanics and Basic Animal Science

This course is recommended as an introduction to advanced courses related to animal science, production, and marketing, and may count toward a concentration sequence. Students continue to learn agricultural mechanics, with emphasis placed on fundamentals of electricity, arc welding, gas cutting and welding, small engines, power woodworking, and wood and metal preservatives. They also receive instruction in animal science and further develop competencies in rural and urban living, leadership, and resource conservation. (Maximum Class Size of 20 students)

Foundations of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources

This course is designed to develop competencies in each of the career pathways as they pertain to agricultural education, including the areas of Virginia's agriculture industry; the global scope of agriculture; scientific research concepts in plant, animal, and food science; principles of leadership and opportunities within student organizations; agricultural skills and safety in power, structural, and technical systems; and natural resources and environmental systems. (Maximum Class Size of 20 students)

Agricultural Production Management

Objectives for this course help students to experience and develop a knowledge of local career opportunities. Students will be able to develop leadership potential and reasoning skills; increase their knowledge and skills in agricultural mechanics; gain knowledge and understanding of supervised agricultural experience programs and skills involved in agribusiness management; understand the basic knowledge related to animal systems; gain knowledge and understanding or surveying and leveling, skills related to constructing agricultural structures, livestock reproduction and management; develop safe work habits; and incorporate, apply, and reinforce related Virginia SOL's. (Maximum Class Size of 20 students)

Agricultural Production Technology

Objectives for this course enable students to experience and develop a knowledge of local career opportunities. They will be able to develop leadership potential and reasoning skills; increase knowledge and skills in agricultural mechanics; gain knowledge and understanding of supervised agricultural experience programs and equine management; understand the basic knowledge related to crop systems; gain knowledge and understanding of surveying, skills related to designing agricultural structures, and livestock diseases and nutrition. Students will develop safe work habits. The Virginia SOL's will be incorporated into these objectives. (Maximum Class Size of 20 students)

Aquaculture

Objectives for this course help students to experience and develop a knowledge of career opportunities in Aquaculture. Students will be able to develop skills necessary to care for and maintain an aquatic system. Students will gain knowledge and skills in the history of aquatic plants and animal life, management, health, water quality, Federal and state regulations, structures, exotic aquatics, careers, and hands on care of an aquatic system. (Maximum Class Size of 20 students)

Floriculture

Students learn the basics of the horticulture plant production industry. Instruction includes the science of plant production as well as marketing and business management. Plant material identification and floral design round out this course to prepare the student for an entry-level position in the floriculture industry. Participation in FFA activities provides leadership development opportunities. (Maximum Class Size of 20 students)

Greenhouse Plant Production and Management

Students enrolled in this course learn the operating procedures for a greenhouse. Units of instruction include developing plant production facilities, science application in plant production, and identification of plants. Business management and marketing skills are emphasized to prepare students for careers in the greenhouse plant production and management industry. Leadership development is offered through participation in FFA. (Maximum Class Size of 20 students)

Floral Design

This course offers expanded study, which was begun in the Horticulture Sciences course. Course content covers career opportunities, floral design foundations, design applications, and the marketing of floral products. Specific design styles to be examined include mass-line, line, vase, wedding, balloon, holiday, and personal-adornment arrangements. The course also emphasizes leadership activities and opportunities to participate in FFA events.

Landscaping

Students develop the necessary knowledge, skills, habits, and attitudes for entry-level employment and advancement in areas such as landscape design, landscape construction, and landscape maintenance. They receive instruction in sketching and drawing, analyzing a landscape site, designing for function and aesthetics, identifying and selecting landscape plants, purchasing and installing plants, and maintaining the landscape by watering, fertilizing, mulching, pruning, and controlling pests. (Maximum Class Size of 20 students)

Turf Establishment and Maintenance

Students begin to master the duties and tasks of professionals who establish and maintain turf in public areas such as golf courses; parks; athletic fields; school, industrial, and institutional campuses; and residential lawns. (Maximum Class Size of 20 students)

Introduction to Natural Resources and Ecology Systems

This course serves as the introductory level course for the Natural Resources Career Pathway. Students will explore the study of natural resources and begin to develop skills and knowledge required for employment in occupations related to forestry, wildlife and natural resources management, and conservation. (Maximum Class Size of 20 students)

Advanced Forestry Management

Student learning areas include processing forest products, lumber grading, and determining the feasibility of establishing, financing, and managing a business such as forestry, outdoor recreation, wildlife, or urban conservation. Based upon interests, students may receive instruction in developing and operating campgrounds, hiking and riding trails, riding stables, marinas, vacation farms, and farm ponds. Operation and maintenance of equipment is also emphasized. Leadership training is an important area of instruction. (Maximum Class Size of 20 students)

Forestry Management

This course will offer students instruction in the management of the forest as a resource and as a business. Students will develop knowledge in areas like tree physiology, forest ecology, silviculture, and the management and marketing of forest products. Strong emphasis is placed on developing career skills for the forestry industry as well. (Maximum Class Size of 20 students)

Horticulture

Students develop the necessary knowledge, skills, habits, and attitudes for entry-level employment and advancement in areas such as floriculture, landscape design, greenhouse operation, nursery plant production, and turf management. They receive instruction in using soil and other plant-growing media and in identifying, propagating, and growing horticultural plants in the greenhouse and land laboratory. Instruction is provided in safety practices and leadership development. (Maximum Class Size of 20 students)

Equine Management and Production

In this course, students learn how to care for and manage horses. Equine health, nutrition, management, reproduction, training, evaluation, and showmanship are the major instructional areas. In addition, course content includes instruction in the tools, equipment, and facilities for equine enterprises. Business management topics include the economics of boarding, training, and merchandising horses. Leadership development activities are included, and participation in FFA activities is encouraged. (Maximum Class Size of 20 students)

Small Animal Care

Students learn how to care for and manage small animals, focusing on instructional areas in animal health, nutrition, management, reproduction, evaluation, training, and, when applicable, showmanship. Course content also includes instruction in the tools, equipment, and facilities for small animal care, and provides activities to foster leadership development. FFA activities are included.

Veterinary Science

This course provides students with the employability and technical skills needed to succeed in postsecondary education and a career in veterinary medicine or in a related occupation. Course content will include the integration of academics and career skills and instruction in the use of tools, equipment, and facilities for veterinary medicine. Business management, leadership and FFA activities are included in the course. Students enrolled in the course should have a strong background in math and science and knowledge of small animal care. (Maximum Class Size of 20 students)

Business and Information Technology

Washington County Schools ensures equal access to all CTE courses; accessibility accommodations will be provided, if needed.

Accounting

Students study the basic principles, concepts, and practices of the accounting cycle for a service business and a merchandising business. Topics covered include analyzing transactions, journalizing and posting entries, preparing payroll records and financial statements, and managing cash systems. Ethics and professional conduct are emphasized. Students learn fundamental accounting procedures using both manual and electronic systems.

Advanced Accounting

Students gain knowledge of advanced accounting principles, procedures, and techniques used to solve business problems and to make financial decisions. Students use accounting and spreadsheet software to analyze, synthesize, evaluate, and interpret business financial data. Students work in a technology – integrated environment using authentic workplace industry scenarios that reflect current industry trends and standards.

Advanced Computer Information Systems

Students apply problem-solving skills to real-life situations through advanced integrated software applications, including multimedia presentations, printed and electronic desktop publications, and Web site development. Students work individually and in groups to explore advanced computer maintenance activities, telecommunications, programming, and networking.

Computer Information Systems

Students apply problem-solving skills to real-life situations through word processing, spreadsheets, databases, multimedia presentation, and integrated software activities. Students work individually and in groups to explore computer concepts, operating systems, networks, telecommunications, and emerging technologies.

Programming

Students explore computer concepts, apply logic procedures, and implement programming procedures with one or more languages, such as Visual Basic.Net, Java, C#, and C++. Graphical User Interfaces, such as Alice, Game Maker, and Flash, may be used as students design and develop interactive multimedia applications. In addition, HTML, or JavaScript may be employed to create Web pages.

Information Technology (IT) Fundamentals

Information Technology (IT) Fundamentals introduces the essential technical and professional skills required for students to pursue programs leading to professional careers and IT certifications. Students investigate career opportunities and technologies in four major IT area: Information Services and Support, Network Systems, Programming and Software Development, and Interactive Media. Students will evaluate the impact of IT on other career clusters. The focus of the IT Fundamentals course is the introduction of skills related to information technology basics, Internet fundamentals, network systems, computer maintenance/upgrading/troubleshooting, computer applications, programming, graphics, Web page design, and interactive media. Students explore ethical issues related to computers and Internet technology and develop teamwork and communication skills that will enhance their employability.

Business Law

Students examine the foundations of the American legal system and learn the rights and responsibilities of citizens. Students gain practical knowledge and life skills by exploring economic and social concepts related to laws governing business and individuals. Focus areas include contracts, consumer protection, criminal law, tort law, international law, family/domestic law, employment law, and careers in the legal professional.

Business Management

Students study basic management concepts and leadership styles as they explore business ownership, planning, operations, marketing, finance, economics, communications, the global marketplace, and human relations. Quality concepts, project management, problem solving, and ethical decision making are an integral part of the course. Student leadership skills may be enhanced by participation in school-based or virtual enterprises, job shadowing, internships, cooperative education, and/or the Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA).

Design, Multimedia, and Web Technologies

Students develop proficiency in creating desktop publications, multimedia presentations/projects, and Web sites using industry standard application software. Students incorporate principles of layout and design in completing publications and projects. Students design portfolios that may include business cards, newsletters, mini-pages, Web pages, multimedia presentations/projects, calendars, and graphics.

Advanced Design, Multimedia, and Web Technologies

Students develop advanced skills in creating interactive media, Web sites, and publications for print and electronic distribution. Students work with sophisticated hardware and software applying skills learned to real-world projects.

Economics & Personal Finance

Students learn how to navigate the financial decisions they must face and to make informed decisions related to career exploration, budgeting, banking, credit, insurance, spending, taxes, saving, investing, buying/leasing a vehicle, living independently, and inheritance. Development of financial literacy skills and an understanding of economic principles will provide the basis for responsible citizenship and career success. In addition to developing personal finance skills, students in the 36-week course will also study basic occupational skills and concepts in preparation for entry-level employment in the field of finance. The course incorporates all economics and financial literacy objectives included in the Code of Virginia §22.1-200-03B.

Digital Input Technologies

Digital Input Technologies introduces new and emerging input devices, e.g., speech- and handwriting-recognition software, headset/microphone, personal digital assistant (PDA), scanner, digital camera, digital video camera, keyboard, and mouse) to prepare students for using tools that are becoming standard in the workplace and in everyday life.

Principles of Business and Marketing

Students discover the roles of business and marketing in the free enterprise system and the global economy. Basic financial concepts of banking, insurance, credit, inheritance, taxation, and investments are investigated to provide a strong background as students prepare to make sound decisions as consumers, wage earners, and citizens. The real-world impact of technology, effective communication, and interpersonal skills is evident throughout the course. This course also supports career development skills and explores career options.

English Department

English 9

The English 9 student will present and critique dramatic readings of literary selections and will continue to develop proficiency in making planned oral presentations. Knowledge of literary terms and forms will be applied in the student's own writing and in the analysis of literature. Students will be introduced to significant literary works from a variety of cultures and era, from 1000 A.D. to the present. Increased requirements for research and reporting in all subjects are supported by the use of electronic databases and a standard style sheet method to cite reference sources. Writing will encompass narrative, literary, expository, and technical forms, with particular attention to analysis.

English 9 (Honors)

The primary objective of English 9 (Honors) is to prepare students to communicate effectively. Emphasis is placed on four areas: oral language, reading/literature, writing, and research. This course attempts to develop student proficiency in planned oral presentations and oral readings of literary selections. The course also promotes a knowledge of literary forms and terms through familiarity with exemplary authors and literary works from a variety of cultures and areas. Students will explore and articulate ideas and issues through narrative, literary, expository, and technical writing. Skills for increasing student proficiency in research techniques, use of the English language, and critical thinking skills will be utilized throughout these writing activities.

Numerous resources are used in achieving these objectives. These include textbooks, supplementary texts, supplementary class sets of books, library resource materials, audio-visual aids, computer resources, guest speakers, the English Curriculum Instructional Guide, and the Standards of Learning booklet.

Assessment methods include written tests, both teacher-prepared and standardized; semester exams; original projects which incorporate research, organizational, and oral presentation skills; group work which provides an informal means of evaluating students' willingness to cooperatively interact with and help others; and evaluating class participation which includes enthusiasm toward and interest in the discussion, willingness to answer questions, and appreciation for the ideas of others.

English 10

The 10th grade English student will read and critique short stories, dramatic selections, nonfiction essays, poetry, and a novel. This literature will come from a variety of eras and cultures which the student will compare and contrast. The student will study the similarities and differences in cultural influences as well as universal themes that are represented. Attention in writing will be given to effective word choice and vivid description as well as development of varied sentences and well-organized and logically-structured paragraphs. The student will edit and critique both personal and peer writing. Analysis of printed consumer information will be included in the course. The student will practice oral communication skills and communication in small group learning activities.

English 10 (Honors)

Students in English 10 (Honors) will participate in group activities in which they are responsible for specific roles, create an outline of group activities, prepare a summary of the group accomplishments, and present the group=s findings in oral presentations. Throughout the course, students will be exposed to various forms of writing, including poetry, short stories, plays, and novels coming from a variety of eras as well as culture. Students will read and critique literature, focusing on the similarities and differences, structures, images, and themes, as well as examine literature from several different perspectives. They will read and interpret consumer materials and identify essential information necessary for operating specific tools and machinery. They will analyze information presented in contracts, job and technical descriptions, and warranties. While studying poetry, students will critique the work by focusing on the use of rhyme, sound, and rhythm in order to convey a message. Various elements of poetry and dramatic elements will be demonstrated through class productions. Writing skills will be developed through a variety of writing assignments, and students will plan and organize ideas clearly through word choice and clear, varied sentences. They will edit writing for clarity and content, correct use of language, and correct grammatical structure. They will participate in a research project in which they learn various methods of research and techniques to compose a research paper or project.

Resources used in English 10 (Honors) to achieve the objectives are materials related to the SOL's which include textbooks, sets of supplementary novels, dictionaries, library resources, audio-visual aids, computer resources (including the Internet, CD-ROM's, and computer programs), guest speakers, and supplementary texts.

The methods of assessment include written tests, essays, exams, projects, group work, homework, and class participation.

English 11

English 11 will include a review and re-teaching of those basic grammar skills which should be used in the writing of a three to seven paragraph essay. Students will also write a research paper, containing the appropriate citation for several references. Reading assignments will include poetry, essays, short stories, and novels. Periodicals and newspapers will also be read and studies, in addition to the use of encyclopedias and other reference sources. Public speaking skills will be assessed as students present a variety of speeches. Students will also develop listening skills as they learn to critique student speeches.

English 11 - Language and Composition (Advanced Placement)

English 11 – Language and Composition (Advanced Placement) is designed to prepare students for the AP Examination. Students acquire skills to develop written essays based on prose analysis and argumentation. To achieve proficiency in these types of writing, students are presented with a thorough background in the elements of language and prose, as well as practical skills in applying logic to express their arguments. Vocabulary is emphasized throughout the course. Students develop test-taking skills which prepare them for the multiple-choice segment of the examination. Both large and small groups are used for skill development. Students are also exposed to the thoughts of great minds from ancient to modern times, and they are encouraged to apply this knowledge in their writing. Additionally, students will read six novels which are integrated into the body of student-produced work. Students will write a research paper.

English 11 (Honors)

Similar in content to English 11, English 11 (Honors) focuses to a greater extent on critical thinking and college preparatory skills. This course develops oral presentation skills, with attention to the accuracy of evidence and effectiveness of delivery. It enhances an appreciation of classic and contemporary American literature and assists students in identifying prevalent themes and characterizations which are reflective of the history and culture. The course also allows students to identify the contributions of other cultures to the development of American literature. This course provides instruction on the writing of clear and accurate business and technical reports. An emphasis is placed on the writing of expository and persuasive essays through locating, evaluating, synthesizing, and citing information. Attention is placed on the organization and accuracy of student writing. Students will write a research paper.

Resources used in English 11 (Honors) include textbooks, class sets of novels, Curriculum Designer, Standards of Learning booklet, media center resources, computer resources, audiovisual aids, reference materials, and supplementary texts.

Students will be assessed through both written and oral quizzes and tests. The student's self-expressions will be assessed through evaluation of journal entries. Their participation, preparation, and organization will be assessed through daily assignment record keeping. Student's improvement will be monitored and encouraged. Their weaknesses will be monitored and remediated through recommended tutoring.

English 12

The objectives for the twelfth grade English course include the four components of the Virginia SOL's. In oral language the focus is on developing speaking skills in preparation for a formal oral presentation. In reading and literature the focus is on reading and critiquing poetry and drama from various cultures, analyzing various forms of British literature from different chronological eras, and reading a variety of informational and technical texts. In writing the primary focus is on developing expository and technical writing which is edited to conform to accepted standards of English usage. In research, students will write a research paper using a recognized method of documentation.

Resources used to achieve the objectives for English 12 include textbooks, sets of supplementary novels, dictionaries, library resources, audiovisual aids, computer resources, guest speakers, and supplementary texts.

Methods of assessment include written tests, essays, exams, projects, group work, homework, participation in class discussions, and evaluation of oral presentations by teacher and peers.

English 12 - Literature (Advanced Placement)

English 12 – Literature (Advanced Placement) is a special course designed to afford outstanding students the opportunity to take a college-level course while attending high school. Students will read an average of twelve novels during the year. They will learn to analyze, to evaluate, and to criticize novels, short stories, plays, and poetry. The first semester will concentrate on the study of the elements of the short story, while the second semester will examine traditional British literature, drama, and poetry. Students will write many essays, participate in group discussion, practice literary analysis and criticism, and write a term, or research, paper on a literary subject. The ultimate goal of the course work and evaluative models is to prepare for the AP Examination, which is required of all students wishing credit in AP English.

Resources used include a textbook, sets of supplementary novels, dictionaries, media center resources, audio-visual aids, computer resources, guest speakers, and supplementary texts.

Students are assessed by written tests, semester exams, essays, projects, group work, participation in class discussions, homework, and evaluation of oral presentations by teachers and peers.

English 12 (Honors)

Similar in content to English 12, English 12 (Honors) focuses on skills necessary for success in college: critical thinking, note taking, reading to learn, critical listening, test taking, speaking effectively, and writing effectively. The emphasis in writing is on the college essay, literary analyses, and the research paper. The emphasis in literature is on reading analytically in order to critique not only the content, but also the author's style and use of literary techniques. While the methods of assessment are the same as those used in English 12, in English 12 (Honors), students may be held to a more exacting standard of performance.

English 12 (Dual Enrollment - VHCC)

English 12 Concurrent is a dual enrollment class, providing an opportunity for high school students to receive college credit from Virginia Highlands Community College. This course seeks to develop writing ability for study, work, and other areas of writing based on experience, observation, research, and reading of selected literature. The course assists students in understanding the concept of writing as a process involving the elements of understanding, composing, revising, and editing. Students are encouraged to integrate into their writing experiences in thinking, reading, listening, and speaking.

Newspaper

Through the publication of the school newspaper, students learn and practice the journalistic skills of interviewing, writing different types of stories (such as news, features, or sports), copy-editing, and laying out the paper using desktop publishing software. Students also learn public relations/marketing techniques by selling ads. Meeting deadlines teaches responsibility and accountability, and small group work teaches working cooperatively as a team member. Learning is individualized using each student's talents, but all students are expected to sell ads, write stories, and do layout.

Speech and Drama

This is a study of the art of communication and its relevance to all walks of life. Objectives of this course enable students to be better communicators in both personal and public interaction; to be able to effectively organize and deliver various form of oration; to understand drama as an art form; and to promote and preserve the arts.

Resources include films, music, plays, field trips, set-work, and theatre workshops.

Evaluation methods include participation in oral presentations, written assignments, homework, tests, and exams.

Yearbook

Through the publication of the school yearbook in this course, students acquire knowledge relating to computer publishing software. Students create and edit a yearbook using word processing skills, graphic programs, scanners, and publishing software. Students learn to elaborate ideas clearly and precisely through word choice and vivid descriptions of pictures and events. Students also learn to organize ideas into logical sequence and to revise and edit writing for clarity and content. They illustrate creativity through layout design, pictures, and artwork. Students achieve the objectives of the SOL's of Virginia through the publication of the yearbook.

Fine Arts Department

Drawing I and II

Grades 9-12. For students who want to learn to draw or to improve their drawing skills. They will work in a variety of drawing media with emphasis on drawing from life.

Art I

Art I introduces the student to the elements of art and the principles of design. Following Virginia SOL's, this course includes art history, aesthetics, art criticism, and studio production. The students will work in drawing from life, painting with watercolor and tempera paint, ceramics, sculpture, printmaking, papermaking, lettering and poster design, and bookbinding. Objectives of the course include promoting the students understanding and uses of the elements of art and the principles of design; learning to identify and use the proper techniques in the various areas of art and its production; giving the student an opportunity to grow personally as they learn about art, art history, and artists; giving the student the environment in which to develop a personal artistic style; and helping the student learn to draw.

Resources include a classroom set of textbooks.

Methods of assessment include daily class work assignments, a portfolio of art work throughout the year, notes, make-up work, tests, exams, daily sketchbook drawings, projects, and homework.

Art II

Art II reinforces the elements of art and the principals of design. Following Virginia SOL's and meeting those in Advanced Art, included in this course are art history, aesthetics, art criticism, and studio production. The student will work in drawing from life, painting with watercolor and acrylic, ceramics, sculpture, printmaking, papermaking, and bookbinding. Goals of the course include students understanding definitions and uses of the elements of art and principles of design and apply them in original compositions; identifying and using proper techniques in the various areas of art; growing personally in learning about art, art history, and artists; beginning to develop personal artistic styles; improving drawing skills; and acquiring a working knowledge of art vocabulary.

Resources include a classroom set of textbooks.

Methods of assessment include daily class work assignments, a portfolio of art work throughout the year, notes, make-up work, tests, exams, daily sketchbook drawings, projects, and homework.

Art III and IV

Art III and IV is an advanced course which requires completion of Art II. This course goes into greater depth using the elements of art and the principles of design. Following Virginia SOL's this course includes art history, aesthetics, art criticism, and studio production. Each six weeks students work on an independent project meeting certain criteria. Emphasis is placed on communication, both visual and verbal. Writing about one's work is part of the process of producing works of art. Different projects are introduced each year so that Art IV students do not repeat what was done the previous year. Students will be able to apply elements of art and principles of design in original compositions; identify and use proper techniques in the various areas of art; make art, art history, and artists more important; refine personal artistic style; improve drawing skills and communication skills; and use their working knowledge of art vocabulary as mandated in the SOL's.

Resources used include a set of classroom textbooks and supplemental readings from Scholastic Art Magazine.

Methods of assessment include daily class work assignments, a portfolio of art work throughout the year, notes, make-up work, tests, exams, daily sketchbook drawings, projects, and homework.

Art History

Art History is an academic non-studio course where students should be academically inclined or interested in learning about art history. Major art movements in the Western World will be covered with emphasis on modern times, the 19th and 20th centuries. Painting, sculpture, architecture, design, and photography are the main areas studied. Lives of selected artists will be studied. Local field trips will enable students to see both contemporary and traditional art form. Topics covered in this course include Prehistoric through Medieval; the Rebirth of Art - the Renaissance and the Baroque; the 19th and 20th centuries; contemporary art; and making comparisons. Students will be able to acquire an appreciation and knowledge of art history; attain the desire to learn more about art history either on their own or through further course work; and meet the Virginia SOL's regarding Art History under Art Appreciation.

Resources include a set of classroom textbooks, supplemental texts, and Scholastic Art Magazine.

Methods of assessment include daily class work assignments, a notebook including Artist of the Day sheets and video review sheets, note assignments, tests, homework, and exams.

Graphic Design One

Graphic Design One is a beginning drawing class for those who like or would like to learn to draw. This course goes over basic drawing techniques, methods, and a variety of drawing tools to help improve skills for different skill levels. Students will be introduced to different artists and artistic styles. Students will be introduced to traditional drawing mediums and contemporary mediums such as computer art software programs and computer drawing tablets. This course meets all Virginia learning standards.

Ceramics

Ceramics is a beginning level art class open to all grade levels. Ceramic clay projects include hand building construction methods and potter's wheel throwing methods. Students will also learn about ceramic arts and artist throughout art history. Students will also investigate classical, modern and contemporary ceramic artists and ceramic construction techniques. Included in the ceramic course will be traditional ceramic clays and glazes and a unit on man-made polymer clays, construction methods and projects.

Chorus I, II, III, IV

Course objectives include the following items. Virginia SOL's will be emphasized through theoretical understanding of music and a promotion of greater aesthetic appreciation of the arts and world through performance in and out of the classroom. Students will have a safe learning-conducive environment; perform with musical understanding; nurture the development of aural skills; learn successful tone quality and intonation and proper singing technique (posture and breathing); develop group ethics and group camaraderie; differentiate purity of vowels and correct use of consonants; enhance their appreciation for the performing arts through performance and attendance at a major musical production; learn solo performance strategies; and acquire a earned experience where they will work toward proven good behavior and attainment of a higher level of performance. Theory lessons will be similar for all course levels. Performance literature will differ according to grade level. Skills will be developed and built upon in each subsequent level.

Resources utilized include audio recordings, guest performers, music library and purchased music, video recordings, music web sites, field trips, and music festivals.

Methods of assessment include quizzes, tests, attendance, class participation, reflective writing, and exams.

Instrumental Music - Color Guard

Areas of instruction in this course include music rudiments, marching band techniques, choreography, movement, design fundamentals, and equipment skills. Students will demonstrate proficiency in the execution of choreographed shows incorporating body, movement, equipment, and various props. Pertinent concepts and specialized vocabulary will be mastered. This includes the music elements of rhythm, articulation, dynamics, phrasing, and form. Other goals are methods of movement, timing, body alignment, angles, and equipment technique. Differentiation for grade level or ability is achieved through the careful assignment of parts, principal parts, and edited parts. Students who enroll multiple years will exhibit greater proficiency and maturity, particularly with regard to interpretation and expression. Learning to make judgments about the esthetic qualify of music selection and choreography, as well as the quality of the performance, is encouraged. A far-reaching objective is to foster a greater understanding and lifelong appreciation for the arts.

Resources include hands-on experience in meeting objectives of the Virginia SOL's. Performances are video taped and used for feedback and critiquing. A professional designer creates shows for major competition performances.

Methods of assessment include participation, which includes both the amount and quality of participation. Other methods include individual or small group performance tests, as feasible, as well as solo work, projects, and written tests.

Instrumental Music - Winds, Percussion, Brass, and Ensemble

Areas of instruction in this course include marching band techniques, concern band performances, survey of band literature, sight reading, audition preparation, technical development, and basic music theory. Objectives for the course, which integrate the Virginia SOL's, include the following. Students are expected to demonstrate continued development and refinement of all concepts essential to an outstanding musical performance. The expectation of greater proficiency provides new challenges each year. Differentiation for grade level or playing ability is achieved through careful assignment of divided (sheet music) parts, principal parts, and edited parts. The ability to make judgments about the esthetic quality of music literature, as well as the quality of musical performance, is nurtured. A far-reaching objective is to foster a greater understanding and lifelong appreciation for music. Students are eligible to participate in several County, District, and State band events. Performance and adjudication opportunities also exist for the band, individual musicians and small groups.

Resources used include concert band literature; appropriate solo and ensemble literature; method books for marching band, jazz, pop, etc.; and various supplementary materials for technical development (scale exercises, etc.). Special emphasis is placed on audition preparation and participation in opportunities such as All County Band, All District Band, and other special honor groups. Students have numerous performance opportunities and private study is encouraged.

Evaluation methods include participation, which is the major portion of assessment. Both the amount and quality of participation is considered. Other methods of assessment include individual or small group playing tests, as well as solo work, projects, and written tests.

Foreign Language Department

French I

In this course, students will work on the four skills - listening, speaking, reading, writing - and culture. This first year they will learn to pronounce French sounds and distinguish between different sounds. They will be able to use the language to communicate in directed and daily activities in the classroom. They will learn the most basic sentence structures essential to comprehension and how punctuation and accents affect meaning. They will be able to read simple materials necessary for functioning in everyday situations. Students will be able to write guided questions and responses, dialogues, and paragraphs. Students will know where the language is spoken and will be aware of routing, traditional, and newsworthy events. Students will become aware of French contributions to American life.

SOL's will be met through the use of the textbook, research, lecture, visuals, and testing.

Student progress will be assessed through a variety of testing methods: cooperative activities, oral comprehension tests, oral interviews, drams, traditional tests, research, and class presentations.

French II

In this course, students will continue work on the four skills - listening, speaking, reading, writing - and culture. They will refine the skills learned in French I through repetition of familiar material. They will learn to apply familiar material in new contexts. Students will be able to meet basic survival needs. They will demonstrate a greater ability to communicate through daily use of French in the classroom. The students' reading vocabulary will greatly expand as they learn to distinguish between past, present, and future. They will continue to be limited to reading for functional purposes. Emphasis in writing will be on spelling, capitalizing, and using accents with increased competency. Students will be able to write guided paragraphs and dialogues using familiar vocabulary and grammatical structures. In the area of culture, students will explore additional aspects of geography, demonstrate comprehension of effective interaction with native speakers and knowledge of lifestyles, traditions, and current events in various areas of the world where French is spoken.

SOL's will be met through use of the textbook, research, lecture, visuals, and testing.

Student progress will be assessed through a variety of testing methods: cooperative activities, oral comprehension tests, oral interviews, drama, traditional tests, research, and class presentations.

French III

In this course, students will continue work on the four skills - listening, speaking, reading, writing - and culture. Students will understand more complex materials, and familiar material will be reinforced. Students will demonstrate progress in pronunciation and intonation. They will be able orally to communicate complex ideas and information in directed activities. Most of the time, communication in class will be in French. The students= reading vocabulary will become broader as they gain recognition of more complex structures. They will read and critique several works of French literature. Students will be able to compose original paragraphs and take notes. They will be able to recognize and use, with some consistency, the present, past, future, conditional, pluperfect, future perfect, and perfect conditional tenses. Students will demonstrate additional knowledge of lifestyles of French-speaking people, selected contributions in the arts and sciences, and selected current and historical developments.

SOL's will be met through the use of the textbook, research, lecture, visuals, and testing.

Student progress will be assessed through a variety of testing methods: cooperative activities, oral comprehension tests, oral interviews, drama, traditional tests, research, and class presentations.

French IV

In this course, students will continue work on the four skills B listening, speaking, reading, writing - and culture. The students will have ample practice in comprehending and using spoken French. They will be exposed to takes and videos of native speakers. Students will demonstrate the ability to communicate in a variety of contexts. They will reinforce reading skills through extensive use of authentic literature. Students will reinforce writing skills through a variety of written activities ranging from note-taking and creative writing to writing research papers. They will demonstrate knowledge of major cultural contributions and historical events through class discussions and personal research. They will demonstrate knowledge of contemporary culture and be able to handle routine social situations.

SOL's will be met through the use to the textbook, research, lecture, visuals, and testing.

Student progress will be assessed through a variety of testing methods: cooperative activities, oral comprehension tests, oral interviews, drama, traditional tests, research, and class presentations.

Latin I

The objectives of Latin I are as follows. The structure and syntax of the Latin language will be presented. An appreciation of Roman civilization will be instilled and its effect on Western civilization. The Latin vocabulary will be integrated with English derivatives and word usage. Students will develop proficiency in the four language skills of reading, writing, listening, and to a lesser degree speaking, all of which are mandated by the Virginia SOL's.

Resources used to achieve the above objectives include a textbook and accompanying workbook. Class activities will involve particular subject matter being studied. Worksheets and projects will be made available through the Classical Association of Virginia (CAV).

Methods of assessment include quizzes, written tests, projects, group work, translations, and class participation. Students will participate in the National Latin Exam produced by the Classical Association of Virginia (CAV).

Latin II

The objectives of Latin II are as follows. The structure and syntax of the Latin language as a continuance on Latin I will be presented. An appreciation of Roman civilization will be instilled and the effect of Western civilization. The Latin vocabulary will be integrated with English derivatives and word usage as a continuance of Latin I. Proficiency will be developed in the four language skills of reading, writing, listening, and to a lesser degree of emphasis, speaking, all of which are mandated by the Virginia SOL's.

Resources include a textbook and accompanying workbook. Class activities involve particular subject matter being students. Worksheets and projects are made available through Classical Association of Virginia (CAV).

Methods of assessment include quizzes, written tests, projects, group activities, translations, and class participation. Students will participate in the National Latin Exam produced by the Classical Association of Virginia (CAV).

Latin III

The objectives of Latin III are as follows. Students will substantially complete the study of the elements of Latin grammar. They will acquire an increased knowledge of English derivatives through association, memorization, and application of prefixes, suffixes, and root words derived from the vocabulary of each author read. Proficiency in the reading of Latin literature will be increased. Students will be able to interpret the selected passages through critical analysis as mandated by the Virginia Standards of Learning (SOL's).

Resources used in this class include a textbook, selected videos, group projects, and selected Latin passages of appropriate difficulty.

Methods of assessment include quizzes, written tests, sight translations, projects, group activities, and class participation. Students may participate in the National Latin Exam produced by the Classical Association of Virginia (CAV).

Latin IV

The objectives of Latin IV are as follows. Students will be able to increase appreciation of the cultural and historical contests of the works read as mandated by the Virginia SOL's. They will have the opportunity to review all elements of grammar in the context of the works read and enlarge a functional Latin vocabulary. Students will be able to identify the syntax common to each author read.

Resources used in Latin IV include a textbook, optional works by specific authors being read, videos, and writings of ancient historians describing events occurring during the time frame being translated. Students may participate in the National Latin Exam produced by the Classical Association of Virginia (CAV).

Methods of assessment include quizzes involving identification of specified constructions in a given Latin passage, tests, group projects, and class participation. Students have the opportunity to participate in the National Latin Exam produced by the Classical Association of Virginia (CAV).

Spanish I

The main objectives of Spanish I are to introduce students to the Spanish language. The skills of listening, speaking, writing, and reading will be equally stressed. Students will be exposed to Hispanic culture. Necessary components of Virginia SOL's will be incorporated.

Resources used include the textbook, Spanish dictionaries, videos, and reference books in the media center.

Methods of assessment include oral quizzes, written tests, exams, projects, group work, and class participation.

Spanish II

This curriculum is a continuation of the Spanish I curriculum with more emphasis on speaking, listening, and reading skills as included in the Virginia SOL's. Included is the use of verbs in the present, preterite, imperfect, and present progressive tenses, with emphasis on reading, writing, and speaking in the preterite tense. The course also includes a comparison of verbs which have the same meaning but different uses. Upon completion of Spanish II, students will be able to correctly use a variety of grammatical structures, both in written and oral contexts. Cultural emphasis will be placed on Puerto Rico, religious ceremonies, shopping in various types of stores and markets, as well as a brief introduction to the famous Spanish novel, Don Quixote.

Resources used include textbook, novels, and videos.

Assessment will be made by class discussion and participation, written and oral comprehensive tests, quizzes, homework, writings and dialogues based on the cultural objectives, and exams.

Spanish III

Spanish III includes the SOL's for that year, including reviewing all verb tenses and adding the compound tenses, as well as the subjunctive. A more comprehensive vocabulary is stressed as well as development in sentence structure in writing. The student will be able to talk about themselves and their families, will make requests, and give information on various subjects such as directions, etc. They will be able to relate simple stories and facts in the past. The student should also be able to identify stereotypes and culture differences in Hispanic countries. They will use the text of Spanish songs, poems, videos, and short stories.

Students will be assessed with both written and oral tests, homework, projects, group work, and class assignments.

Spanish IV and V

Because of numbers and scheduling conflicts with juniors and seniors, this is a combined class. The curriculum is alternated and includes historical readings, legends, short novels, and plays from the country being studied. One year literature, culture, geography, and the art of Spain are stressed, and the next year that of Mexico is stressed. The course also works on different communication - reading, writing, and listening skills based on SOL's for the level taught. Having completed this course the students will have a good understanding of the language, culture, and history of the two largest Spanish-speaking countries. The Spanish V student has a much stronger background in these areas.

Resources used include textbook, several short novels, poems, videos, realia, and lecture materials from various Spanish resources.

The students are assessed by written and oral tests, projects, group work, homework, and class assignments.

Health & Physical Education Department

9th Grade Physical Education

The 9th grade physical education classes are expected to be active participants during class each day. This includes being properly attired. There is a daily routine of warm-up, jogging, stretching, exercise, and cool-down. The semester activities include Presidential Physical Fitness, health fair, lifelong activities, weight training, individual and team sports, and aerobics. Safety is of utmost importance in each and every activity.

Students will demonstrate proficiency in all areas of fitness. They will demonstrate basic knowledge of various individual and team sports. Students will understand the importance of daily physical activity to enhance their physical well-being as they age. Students will comprehend the importance of safety as the focus of every activity, e.g., weight training.

Methods of evaluation are determined by the accumulation of daily participation, proper attire, written tests, and sportsmanship.

9th Grade Health

The 9th health curriculum is required in the Commonwealth of Virginia for graduation. The course is divided into two halves with the first semester consisting of health and wellness and the second semester physical education. The health program is divided into five major categories: alcohol and other drugs, consumer health, disease prevention and control, first aid, and personal health and wellness with an emphasis on nutrition.

Resources include hands-on practical applications through experience, lecturers, media center research, and the textbook.

Student assessment is based on the quality and amount of participation, quiz and test scores, quality of research work, class assignments, and exams.

10th Grade Physical Education

The 10th grade physical education program consists of various activities. There is a daily stretching and exercise program prior to the activities to work on flexibility, strength, and injury prevention. Activities include state physical fitness testing, team sports, individual sports, and lifelong sports. Students are expected to be properly attired and prepared for class. They are also expected to participate in all activities and to practice proper citizenship and safety procedures. It is the desire that students will find various sports and/or activities which they enjoy and can participate in outside of school in order to live a more fit and productive life.

Students will be evaluated and assessed on the basis of attendance, dress, participation, and written tests.

Advanced Physical Education

This upper-level class is designed to teach a variety of lifelong activities. The class is not required for graduation, but students earn one credit for completion of this elective. This course is offered to juniors and seniors.

Activities differ from normal physical education by offering more lifelong activities such as swimming, canoeing, kayaking, fishing, water safety, beach volleyball, repelling, golf, tennis, orienteering, bowling, camping, outdoor cooking, archery, and special classes such as CPR, Youth Leadership, and Virginia Hunter Education.

Students are taught to work together so each activity will be enjoyable for the entire class. Safety is of utmost importance when planning any activity. Therefore, students are required to find ways to make each sport or activity risk-free.

The following objectives are designed so students can learn the importance of continuing lifelong activities into adulthood, thus developing total wellness. Students will help develop and teach activities. Students will share safety techniques. Students will take specialty classes that encourage total wellness. Students will plan and provide an activity that will include the entire student body and benefit the community as well. Lifetime activities will be planned to teach students to stay physically, mentally, and socially fit.

Assessment will be based on daily participation, class projects, individual work, and written comprehensive exams.

Driver's Education

Objectives of driver's education will focus students on the interaction of people, vehicles, and roadways. Students will learn to reduce risk while driving on different types of highways and will learn the rules of the road. Highway signs, signals, and markings will be taught. Students will learn legal responsibilities such as ownership, registration, tags, and inspections. They will also learn about alcohol and other drugs while using or not using the HTS.

Resources used include group discussions, oral reports, map study, videos, DARE officers, speakers on railroad safety, speakers on organ donors, insurance agency speakers, and speakers on truck safety.

Methods of evaluation include oral presentation; written reports; group projects; individual projects; and daily, chapter, and unit written tests and exams.

Marketing Education Department

Washington County Schools ensures equal access to all CTE courses; accessibility accommodations will be provided, if needed.

Introduction to Marketing

Students gain a basic understanding of marketing and its importance and develop fundamental social, economic, mathematical, marketing, job search, and occupational decision-making skills necessary for successful initial employment in retail, wholesale, or service businesses. Academic skills (mathematics, science, English, and history/social science) related to the content are a part of this course. Computer/technology applications supporting this course are studied.

Marketing

Students examine activities in marketing and business important for success in marketing employment and postsecondary education. Students will learn how products are developed, branded, and sold to businesses and consumers. Students will analyze industry trends and gain hands-on experience in the marketing of goods, services, and ideas. Topics will include professionalism in the workplace, product planning and positioning, promotion, pricing, selling, economic issues, and the impact of technology on the marketplace. This course reinforces mathematics, science, English, and history/social science Standards of Learning (SOL). Computer/technology applications and DECA activities enhance the course. DECA, the co-curricular student organization, offers opportunities in leadership, community, and competitive events. The cooperative education method is available for this course. Students combine classroom instruction and supervised on-the-job training in an approved position with continuing supervision throughout the school year.

Advanced Marketing

Students build on knowledge gained in a prior Marketing course. Students participate in supervisory and management activities focusing on the marketing mix, purchasing, financing, human resources, global marketing, pricing, and emerging technologies. Students will prepare for advancement in marketing careers and postsecondary education. This course reinforces mathematics, science, English, and history/social science Standards of Learning (SOL). Computer/technology applications and DECA activities enhance the course. DECA, the co-curricular student organization, offers opportunities in leadership, community, and competitive events. The cooperative education method is available for this course. Students combine classroom instruction and supervised on-the-job training in an approved position with continuing supervision throughout the school year.

Sports, Entertainment, and Recreation Marketing

This introductory course helps students develop a thorough understanding of fundamental marketing concepts and theories as they relate to the sports, entertainment, and recreation industries. Students will investigate the components of branding, sponsorships and endorsements, as well as promotion plans needed for sports, entertainment and recreation events. The course also supports career development skills and explores career options. Academic skills (mathematics, science, English, and history/social science) related to the content are a part of this course. The cooperative education method is available for this course. Students combine classroom instruction and supervised on-the-job training in an approved position with continuing supervision throughout the school year.

Fashion Marketing

In this specialized course, students gain basic knowledge of the apparel and accessories industry and skills necessary for successful employment in apparel businesses. Students develop general marketing skills necessary for successful employment in fashion marketing, general marketing skills applicable to the apparel and accessories industry, and specialized skills unique to fashion marketing. Personal selling, sales promotion, purchasing, physical distribution, market planning, and product/service technology as well as academic skills (mathematics, science, English, and history/social science) related to the content are part of this course. Computer/technology applications supporting this course are studied. The cooperative education method is available for this course. Students combine classroom instruction and supervised on-the-job training in an approved position with continuing supervision throughout the school year.

Advanced Fashion Marketing

Students with a career interest in apparel and accessories marketing gain in-depth knowledge of the apparel and accessories industry and skills important for supervisory-management employment in apparel businesses. They develop advanced skills unique to fashion marketing and advanced general marketing skills applied to the apparel and accessories industry. Professional selling, sales promotion, buying, merchandising, marketing research, product/service technology, and supervision as well as academic skills (mathematics, science, English, and history/social science) related to the content are part of this course. Computer technology applications supporting this course are studied.

Math Department

Algebra I

Students in Algebra I are expected to achieve the objectives of the SOL's of Virginia. In the course, students make connections among arithmetic, geometry, and probability and statistics. Connections are also made to other subject areas through practical applications. Students come to attach meaning to the abstract concepts of algebra. Students are required to use algebra as a tool for representing and solving a variety of practical problems. Tables and graphs are used to interpret algebraic expressions, equations, and inequalities and to analyze functions. Matrices are also used to organize and manipulate data. Students use calculators and computers when they are available to assist in problem solving. In the course, students are encouraged to discuss mathematics, use the language and symbols of mathematics to communicate, discuss problems and problem solving, and develop confidence in mathematics.

The graphics calculator, textbook, and appropriate videos are the major resources used.

Evaluations of student's knowledge will be conducted on a regular basis by means of tests, quizzes, homework, class work, and projects.

Algebra, Functions, and Data Analysis

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Algebra I. Within the context of mathematical modeling and data analysis, students will study functions and their behaviors, systems of inequalities, probability, experimental design and implementation, and analysis of data. Data will be generated by practical applications arising from science, business, and finance. Students will solve problems that require the information of linear, quadratic, exponential, or logarithmic equations or systems of equations.

Through the investigation of mathematical models and interpretation/analysis of data from real life situations, students will strengthen conceptual understandings in mathematics and further develop connections between algebra and statistics.

The infusion of technology in this course will assist in modeling and investigating functions and data analysis.

Algebra II

Students in Algebra II are assumed to have mastered those concepts outlined in the Algebra I and geometry Virginia SOL's. Students study advanced algebraic concepts through functions, polynomials, rational expressions, complex numbers, matrices, and sequences and series. Emphasis is placed on practical application and modeling. Oral and written communication concerning the language of algebra, logic of procedures, and interpretation of results are studied. Students study graphing functions using a transformational approach, including translation, reflections, dilation, and rotation to general a “family of graphs” from a given graph. They study the close relationship between algebraic concepts and graphic representations of functions. They also vary the coefficients and constants and an equation, observe the changes in the graph of an equation, and formulate generalizations that can be applied to many graphs.

The graphics calculator, computers, textbook, and appropriate videos are the major resources.

Evaluations of student's knowledge will be conducted on a regular basis by means of tests, quizzes, homework, class work, and projects.

Calculus

Calculus studies analytic geometry and the calculus of algebraic and transcendental functions which includes the study of limits, derivatives, differentials, and an introduction to integration along with their applications. A knowledge of Algebra I, Algebra II, geometry, and trigonometry are required. The course covers limits, continuity, derivatives of various functions, implicit differentiation, applications of differentiation, integration of functions including logarithms and exponential functions, integration of trigonometric functions, u substitution, integration by parts, trigonometric substitution, trapezoid rule and Simpson's rule, differential equations, and application of Integration. Throughout the course, the Virginia SOL's will be followed as time permits.

The graphics calculator will be used as the major resource.

Evaluation methods will be written tests, exams, quizzes, homework, and class work.

Calculus (Advanced Placement)

This course is for students who have a thorough knowledge of analytic geometry and elementary functions, in addition to college preparatory algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. The purpose of the class is to prepare students for advanced placement in college calculus. The course content is included in the College Board's AP Course Description Syllabus.

The graphics calculator, computers, textbook, and appropriate videos are the major resources.

Evaluation methods include written tests, exam, quizzes, projects, group work, and class participation.

Engineering Calculus (Dual Enrollment)

This course is the most advanced course offered by the Mathematics Department. A strong background in algebra, geometry, and trigonometry is essential with the prerequisite being trigonometry/analysis. The course is offered for college credit as a dual enrollment class with Virginia Highlands Community College and meets syllabus requirements for the Advanced Placement Examination administered by the CEEB. Initially limits, along with continuity of functions, are studied in preparation for a concentration on the two major tools of calculus: differentiation and integration. These tools are developed and extensive applications of both are studied. Both algebraic and transcendental functions are incorporated. Sequences and series are explored and a variety of tests for convergence and divergence are used.

The graphics calculator will be used as a resource.

Evaluation will be determined by written tests, exams, quizzes, homework, and class work.

Computer Science

In computer science, students create web pages using HTML. After learning the mark-up language, they have the ability to create home pages. As students gain additional computer skills, they utilize Netscape Composer, a program assisting with the creation of web pages.

Resources used are computers and various software packages.

Evaluation methods include written tests, exam, quizzes, projects, group work, and class participation.

Geometry (Honors)

Geometry is designed for students who have mastered Algebra I. This course stresses the basic structures of geometry and the development of formal proofs. Topics covered in this course will include an introduction to basic figures and terminology, inductive reasoning, parallel lines, congruent triangles, applications of congruent triangles, quadrilaterals, similarity, trigonometry, circles, polygons, area and volume, constructions, and coordinate geometry. Throughout the course the Virginia SOL's will be followed.

The graphics calculator, a textbook, and appropriate computer software are the major resources.

Written tests, exams, quizzes, homework, class work, and class participation are the evaluation methods.

Pre-Calculus 163/164 (Dual Enrollment)

This course, also referred to as advanced mathematics, is designed for students who have previously studied trigonometry and math analysis and who desire additional preparation prior to enrolling in calculus. Course content includes functions, theory of equations, matrices, linear programming, vectors, sequences and series, polar coordinates, complex numbers, limits, derivatives, probability, and other discreet mathematics topics. Many of these topics are widely used in business and industry. The algorithmic problem-solving method is an additional component of the course. Students are encouraged to communicate both orally and in writing and through the use of journals, projects, and presentations, using the language of mathematics and its symbolism.

Resources include the graphics calculator, computers, videos, and manipulatives.

Evaluation will consist of tests, quizzes, class work, and projects.

Algebra I, Part I

Algebra I, Part I provides students with basic algebra skills necessary to move to a higher level mathematics course geared toward a career in the technical field. The student will learn when to apply which algebra skill to solve application problems. This course covers arithmetic principles and computations including exploring data, whole numbers, decimals, fractions, percents, measurement, graph interpretations, integers, equations and inequalities, polynomials, geometric forms, and applications. The broad goal of this course is to eliminate or reduce math anxiety by making mathematics understandable and applicable to everyday life.

Outside resources include calculators and videos.

Evaluation methods are determined by class participation, quizzes, and tests. An occasional project will be assigned.

Algebra I, Part II

Algebra I, Part II provides students with algebra skills necessary to move on to a higher level mathematics course geared toward a career in the technical field. It presents algebra through ratios and proportions, signed numbers, powers and roots, vectors, linear and nonlinear equations, factoring, quadratics, inequalities, statistics and probability, and applications. It directs applications to specialty areas such as home economics, industrial technology, business and marketing, agriculture, and health occupations. The broad goal of the course is to eliminate or reduce math anxiety by making math understandable and applicable to everyday life. Prerequisites for this class are successful completion of basic algebra or Technical Algebra I.

The graphics calculator, textbook, and cord booklet material are the major resources.

Evaluations of student's knowledge will be conducted on a regular basis by means of tests, quizzes, homework, class work, and projects.

Geometry

Geometry is offered to students who need an “applied” math course. The units include working with lines and angles; working with shapes in 2 and 3 dimensions; using ratio and proportion; working with scale drawings; using signed numbers and vectors; using right triangle relationships; using trig functions; geometry in the workplace; solving problems with computer graphics; spatial visualization; coordinate geometry; logic; and transformations.

Outside resources include calculators, videos with accompanying workbooks, and geometry tools.

Grades are determined by class participation, quizzes, and tests. An occasional project is assigned.

Trigonometry/Analysis

The trigonometry portion of this course is taught during the first semester, and the mathematical analysis component is taught during the second semester. In trigonometry, students should have concepts outlined in the Algebra II SOL's. Trigonometry includes the study of trigonometric definitions, applications, and graphing, as well as solving trigonometric equations and inequalities. Emphasis is placed on using connections between right triangle ratios and trigonometric functions and circular functions. Applications and modeling are utilized. An emphasis is placed on oral and written communication concerning the language of mathematics, logic of procedure, and interpretation of results. In mathematical analysis, students' knowledge of function characteristics is extended, and they are introduced to another mode of mathematical reasoning. Students should have mastered Algebra II concepts and have had an exposure to trigonometry. The content of mathematical analysis serves as an appropriate preparation for calculus.

The graphics calculator, computers, and older edition of the textbook, and appropriate videos are the major resources.

Evaluation methods include written tests, exam, quizzes, projects, group work, and class participation.

Science Department

Anatomy and Physiology

In this course, students will develop an understanding of the anatomical and chemical makeup of cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems as they relate to the whole organism. The students will learn the location and function of the various parts of the skeletal system, muscle system, nervous system, and epithelial system. Students will use both gross and microscopic observations of dissected organs and organisms in order to accomplish these tasks.

Dual Enrollment with A. Linwood Holton Governor's School

This course is comparable to any college-level anatomy class and demands that students be both academically and emotionally prepared to meet the challenges. The class follows the strict guidelines set forth by the Department of Science and Engineering at Virginia Highlands Community College. Upon the completion of the course, students will receive a total of eight semester hour's credit in biology which may transfer as a free science elective or biology elective to the college or university of their choice. The only stipulation is that the grade must be a “C” or better. Parental signature is required prior to students being allowed to begin this class.

Biology (Advanced Placement)

The Advanced Placement Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a college-introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year. It aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. The topic outline includes three main areas of emphasis: chemistry of life, heredity and evolution, and organisms and populations. The course is organized around eight major unifying themes.

The student will be involved in laboratory work throughout the school year. The lab work is at the college level and provides more math skills as well as greater problem-solving situations. Wherever possible in this class, field trips to hear speakers are encouraged. Other resources include the library, access to the Internet for reports and updated scientific information, computer-generated tutorials, movies, laser discs on biological topics, and AP-prepared labs.

Methods of evaluation include labs, quizzes, article summaries, and tests.

Biology (Honors)

In biology (honors), students observe and analyze the characteristic properties of living organisms, including becoming familiar with homeostatic functions, exploring cellular structure and function and mechanisms of transport within cells, classifying organisms, and surveying the kingdoms of living organisms. Students utilize critical thinking skills to develop a greater appreciation of life and man's role in preserving life and the environment. They also analyze the cause and effect of the physical of the physical environment on the health and well-being of organisms, as well as develop skills in the application of proper laboratory techniques and safety. Components of this aspect of the course include microscopy, use of dissection instruments, and handling of laboratory chemicals and specimens.

Biology II-Ecology

Biology II-Ecology is a course designed to follow Earth Science and Biology as the third science credit for students not taking Chemistry or Physics. This course involves hands-on laboratory activities as the student investigates and learns about issues and interactions between man and his environment. The overall ecology curriculum covers the environment in which organisms live, how organisms interact with the environment, and the impact of human activities on the environment. The curriculum emphasizes the interactions of humans and organisms with water, air, and land. The skills stressed are the interpretations of maps, graphs, and tables. Students perform scientific lab procedures which require them to form hypotheses, collect data by using their senses and laboratory instruments, interpret data, and report results. Major topics of study include environmental pollution, biomes, people and their needs, natural resources, and habitat destruction,

Resources include textbook, videos, and field investigations.

Methods of assessment include tests, essays, quizzes, oral reports, and exams.

Biology II (Honors)

In this course, students investigate the variation and diversity which occur within the physical and living environments. They also analyze, interpret, and apply scientific data using logic, mathematics, and scientific law to predict outcomes or solve problems relative to the inheritance of traits. Students analyze components of animal and human behavior and explore various facets of abnormal behavior. This course allows students to explore various aspects of human anatomical structure and function by means of comparative anatomy in dissection procedures. Students develop skills in problem-solving and improve critical-thinking skills and reasoning in order to develop and defend a position relative to various issues in science. An emphasis is placed on developing students' abilities in proper laboratory techniques.

Resources used to achieve objectives include textbook; films; laser discs; computer activities; laboratory equipment such as microscopes, worksheets, specimens of organisms (preserved and living); and the grounds of Abingdon High School.

Methods of evaluation differ depending on the type of information and method of presentation. Evaluation tools include written tests, class discussions, long-term projects, group work, laboratory activities, oral presentations, lab quizzes, and paper-pencil activities.

Chemistry I

Chemistry I allows students to develop a variety of skills associated with scientific inquiry, gain a historical perspective consistent with the theories of chemistry, and acquire an appreciation of the environment and role of chemistry in the preservation of the environment. To reinforce concrete learning experiences, a variety of laboratory exercises, demonstrations, and technology is utilized to illustrate scientific concepts. An emphasis is placed on safety procedures in the laboratory.

Chemistry II (Honors)

Chemistry II allows students to develop problem-solving skills in order to validate the concepts of acid-base theory, equilibrium, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. They develop an understanding of chemical reactions and their reaction mechanisms and utilize chemical models to explain macroscopic observations. Students also extend the concepts of general chemistry to biochemistry and explore the application of chemistry in our lives, including the role that chemistry plays in preserving the environment.

Resources include the textbook entitled CHEMISTRY Visualizing Matter, including all ancillary materials except the LEAP System for computer-aided laboratory; teacher-made laboratory exercises, mathematics exercises, and other handouts; collection of texts and laboratory manuals; library-research materials; computer programs for simulating laboratory exercises; set of CHEM Study Videos which are available in the county media center; and Casio graphing calculators.

Methods of evaluation, based upon student's performance, include homework and its completion and/or accuracy; laboratory reports which include accuracy in reporting and understanding of analysis; quizzes on laboratory, mathematics operations, and narrow topics; chapter or broad topic tests; participation in special projects; term paper in Honors Chemistry; and comprehensive semester examination.

Chemistry (Advanced Placement)

The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. For some students, this course enables them to undertake, as freshmen, second-year work in the chemistry sequence at their institution or to register in courses in other fields where general chemistry is a prerequisite. For other students, the AP Chemistry course fulfills the laboratory science requirement and frees time for other courses.

AP Chemistry should meet the objectives of a good general chemistry course. Students in such a course should attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and a reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems. The course should contribute to the development of the student's abilities to think clearly and to express their ideas, orally and in writing, with clarity and logic. The college course in general chemistry differs qualitatively from the usual first secondary school course in chemistry with respect to the kind of textbook used, the topics covered, the emphasis on chemical calculations and the mathematical formulation of principles, and the kind of laboratory work done by students. Quantitative differences appear in the number of topics treated, the time spent on the course by students, and the nature and the variety of experiments done in the laboratory. Secondary schools that wish to offer an AP Chemistry course must be prepared to provide a laboratory experience equivalent to that of a typical college course.

Earth Science 9

Students in Earth Science will apply basic concepts in all branches of the field which include geology, meteorology, astronomy, and oceanography. Problem-solving and decision-making will be stressed as well as interpretation of maps, graphs, tables, and charts in each of these areas. The scientific method and the development of scientific thought is emphasized in connecting key concepts involving the earth's composition, structure, processes, history, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and its position in space. Major topics of study include plate tectonics, the rock cycle, Earth history, the oceans, weather, climate, and the solar system and universe. A primary goal of these objectives is to prepare students for making informed decisions in matters involving the earth, its natural resources, and space.

Resources include textbook, CD-ROMS, laser discs, videos, and field investigations.

Methods of assessment include tests, essays, quizzes, oral reports, and exams.

Physics

Physics emphasizes a more complex understanding of experimentation, the analysis of data, and the use of reasoning and logic to evaluate evidence. The use of mathematics, including algebra, inferential statistics, and trigonometry, is important, but conceptual understanding of physical systems remains a primary concern. Students build on basic physical science principles by exploring in depth the nature and characteristics of energy and its dynamic interaction with matter. Key areas covered in the course include force and motion, kinetic molecular theory, energy transformations, wave phenomena and the electromagnetic spectrum, light, electricity fields, and non-Newtonian physics. Emphasis is placed on the practical application of physics in other areas of science and technology and how physics affects our world.

The primary resource is the textbook and its associated materials. Also, various laboratory manuals, including Exploring Physics and Math with the CBL (Calculator Based Laboratory) System are used. Appropriate video disks and video tapes, as well as relevant information from the Internet, are incorporated into the instruction process.

Methods of assessment include examinations, tests, quizzes, laboratory exercises, special projects, written and oral reports, homework, and class participation.

Physics B (Advanced Placement)

The AP Physics course is designed to be the equivalent of the general Physics course for a non Physics or Engineering major during the first college year.

The Physics B course includes topics in both classical and modern physics. This course provides a systematic introduction to the main principles of physics and emphasizes the development of conceptual understanding and problem-solving ability using algebra and trigonometry, but rarely calculus. Understanding of the basic principles involved and the ability to apply the principles of physics in the solution of problems is the major goal for this course. In most colleges, this is a one-year terminal course including a laboratory component and is not the usual preparation for more advanced physics and engineering courses. However, the B course provides a foundation in physics for students in the life sciences, pre-medicine, and some applied sciences, as well as other fields not directly related to science.

Earth Science (Honors)

This laboratory science course includes the standards as set forth in the Virginia SOL's. The Earth Science standards connect the study of the earth's composition, structure, processes, and history; its atmosphere, fresh water, and oceans; and its environment in space. The standards stress the interpretation of maps, charts, table, and profiles, the use of technology to collect, analyze, and report data; and science skills in systematic investigation. Problem-solving and decision-making are integral parts of the standards, especially as they relate to the cost and benefits of utilizing the earth's resources. Major topics of study include plate tectonics, the rock cycle, Earth history, the oceans, the atmosphere, weather and climate, and the solar system and universe.

Resources include the textbook and laboratory workbook adopted by the Washington County School System and any supplementary materials provided by the publisher. Audiovisual materials which are available in the school library or county library will be utilized when appropriate. Outside resources such as speakers or educational materials provided by industry will be incorporated into the program where possible.

Methods of assessment include written tests, quizzes, laboratory work, class work, special projects, papers or reports, and homework.

Social Sciences Department

Current History

In this course students will understand how local, regional, state, national, and world issues affect each other. They will understand the role that the media plays in today's society. Special emphasis will be placed on how that role has changed and developed over time. Students will become familiar with certain controversial issues which exist currently in the United States, i.e., prayer in schools, capital punishment, abortion, public school vs. public school, gun laws, affirmative action, etc. They will understand the role that the Bill of Rights plays in lives of American people today. Special emphasis is placed on the First, Second, Fourth, Fifth, and Eighth Amendments.

Resources used in this course include the Bristol Herald Courier, the Internet, Time, Newsweek, U.S. News & World Report, certain approved television shows such as “60 Minutes,” “ Dateline NBC,” and “Primetime Live,” and guest speakers from the community.

Methods of assessment include end-of-section quizzes and tests, oral presentations to the class, weekly summaries written on subject matter discussed, and exams.

Economics

In this course students gain a knowledge of micro-economics, including banks and banking practices, consumer buying skills, credit ratings, insurance, and investment strategies. In addition, the basics of macro- economics are explored. This aspect of the course includes identifying and analyzing principles of supply and demand, economic systems, national economic problems, monetary and fiscal policy, operations of the Federal Reserve, and international trade and finance.

Resources used in this course include the Bristol Herald Courier, national newspapers such as USA Today and the Wall Street Journal, the Internet, and guest speakers from the business community.

Assessment methods used include end-of-section quizzes and tests, oral presentations to the class, weekly summaries written on subject matter discussed, and exams.

Government (Advanced Placement)

Advanced Placement Government is a course designed to give students an analytical and philosophical perspective on politics and government in the United States. Students develop an understanding of the fundamental concepts of democratic theory and philosophy, examine the structure and institutions of the national government, analyze the Constitution and amendments, and investigate political beliefs and behaviors, party politics and interest groups. Civil rights and civil liberties and the interplay of freedom and equality are also primary areas of content and class discussion. The summary objective of the course is to produce an enlightened citizenry patterned after the Jeffersonian ideal. This objective is pursued through consistent emphasis on the knowledge and attitudes necessary for the American democratic experiment to continue and remain vibrant in the 21st century and beyond.

Resources used include textbook, newspapers, videos, magazines, and outside speakers.

Assessments methods of this course include tests, class assignments, homework, article summaries, participation in class, presentations, and exams.

Humanities

Humanities is a study of man's history through the arts and the relevance of art to modern-day man. Objectives of this course include having the students understand the significance of art; to evaluate different genre and recognize their significance to their culture; and promote and preserve the arts in all walks of life. This course is for students at the senior level.

Resources include films, music, magazines, newspapers, guest speakers, and tours and field trips.

Evaluation methods include daily participation, classroom assignments, homework, tests, and exams.

Psychology

In this course students will study the history of psychology through the various methods and approaches of psychologists. They will learn how the human anatomy affects the different emotions, actions, behaviors, intellect, personality, and social well-being. Students will also be taught the different treatments and modifications used to alter and adjust the different emotions, behaviors, and inadequacies of individuals.

Resources used include the textbook, videos, personality tests, IQ testing, and behavior modification contracts.

Methods of assessment include written tests, research paper, class discussions, a variety of projects, and exams.

Sociology

Objectives of this course will enable students to study and analyze different cultures and societies in the world. They will understand the importance of cultural diversity, conformity, and social change. Students will understand and appreciate the value of being an individual in society and will learn about social inadequacies, stratifications, and social institutions such as marriage, etc. They will be able to compare and analyze behavior and deviant behavior to the different perspectives of life in society.

Resources used in this class include the textbook and videos based on the study of different cultures.

Assessment methods include written tests, a research paper, class discussions, a variety of projects, and exams.

United States History

Objectives of United States History include the following. Students will study and analyze the Colonial Period, the nation's beginning, the Revolutionary War, slavery issues, division of the Union, and the reunion of the nation. They will understand the changes, advancements, and struggles that the United States faced with imperialism and becoming a world power. The effects of the economic boom, World War I, the Great Depression, and recovery through The New Deal will be compared. Students will achieve an understanding of the “Hot War” and the “Cold War” years. This will include the study of World War II, origins of the Cold War, and the post-war years (1939-1960). They will get an educational understanding of the different upheavals during the sixties and obtain a better understanding of the Kennedy and Johnson years, civil rights movements, and the Vietnam War. They will be able to see the continuity and change from the Watergate scandal through the Clinton Presidency.

United States History (Advanced Placement)

This course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary for dealing critically with United States history. The class prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students develop the skills necessary for arriving at conclusions based upon informed judgments and learn to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively.

United States History (Dual Enrollment)

This course includes similar content as US History but a more in-depth approach is used. Additional reading, writing, and oral participation is required. The course is designed for the academic student who is willing to accept the challenges of a college-level class. This concurrent course provides six hours of credit through Virginia Highlands Community College and requires a fee, payable to the Washington County School System.

Resources utilized include textbook, videos, resource manuals, and map exercises.

Assessments methods used are class lectures and discussions, written tests, article summaries, creative writing journals, and vocabulary associated with history.

Virginia and United States Government

Course objectives for this class will enable students to answer questions about the origins and the functions of the Virginia and United States political systems. They will be able to demonstrate a knowledge of our United States and Virginia Constitutions. They will be knowledgeable of other significant and historical documents which contributed to the development of our system and become aware of the structure and operation of both levels of federalism. Students will understand how economic and political policies are developed in our country and be able to compare these policies to those of other countries within the international community. Students should gain the ability to exercise critical thinking skills in order to make positive economic and political decisions for our society.

World Geography

The main objectives in this class are derived from the following units: Use of Basic Map and Globe Skills - The student will use maps, gloves, recognize different map projection, apply the concepts of scale, orientation, and grid system and compare different thematic maps of countries, regions, and the world. Analyzing the Earth - Students will understand processes that shape the earth's surface as well has human influence. They will gather an understanding of how peoples' ideas and relationships to the environment have evolved over time and where the earth is in space and how this influences human life, such as the clothes we wear, foods we ear, and activities we do. Earth Systems - Students will compare and contrast systems such as the atmosphere, the hydrological system, keeping solar balance, and the wind and pressure belts and how they impact and influence human life as well as how technological advances help us to understand these systems better. Physical Geography -Students will learn the major land forms of the world, oceans, and waterways and how they were created. Historical Geography - Students will apply geography to interpret the past, understand the present, and predict the future. Examples include migration of people, growth and fall of empires, and economic systems. Regional Geography - Here Earth is divided into areas to study which have common characteristics found throughout them. The different regions of the world will be compared and contrasted. Themes explored are political systems, cultures, human and natural resources, formation of unions between countries, developed and non-developed countries, and patterns of urban development

Resources used include the textbook, CD-ROM's, videos, magazines, and the Internet.

Assessment methods include tests, quizzes, writing of essays, small reports, and exams.

World History I

In World History I students will understand the development of world civilizations from the prehistoric era to 1000 A.D. Emphasis is placed on Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and Asian cultural and geo-political contributions. Students will acquire an appreciation of the world's major religions. This course is an excellent precursor for World History II.

World History II

World History II examines the history and culture of the world from 1000 A.D. to the present. Students will recognize the contributions made during the major time periods. These include the Industrial Revolution and its lasting impact, the Renaissance and Reformation, and major military revolutions.

Resources include the textbook, appropriate videos, primary sources, historical maps, and the Internet.

Assessment methods include tests, library research projects, map activities, and class participation.

William N. Neff Center for Science and Technology

Washington County Schools ensures equal access to all CTE courses; accessibility accommodations will be provided, if needed.

Advertising and Design

This program of study provides competency-based education in the field of advertising design with a strong emphasis on computer graphics, computer animation, desktop publishing, and multimedia presentations. Additionally, students are expected to demonstrate competency with current industry software, digital printing/scanning concepts and procedures, technical illustration and rendering techniques, and mechanical drawings.

Auto Body Repair

This program provides instruction in collisions repair, body panel repair, flexible parts repair and refinishing, fiberglass repair, interior trim and glass replacement, enamel refinishing, urethane single-stage base coat/clear coat refinishing, spot and panel repairs, rust repair, and estimating. Students will analyze all types of body damage and then restore vehicles to their original appearance. (Maximum Class Size of 20 Students)

Auto Body Technology

Major and minor car damage repair - body construction, rebuilding and refinishing techniques. Welding, bonding, sanding, painting and parts replacement skills. Two year program is equivalent to one year field experience. Upon completion of an additional year in field, student is eligible to pursue ASE Certification. (Maximum Class Size of 20 students)

Auto Service Technology

Extensive work with all ASE Certification Test Areas: engine repair. Automatic transmission/transaxle, manual transmission/transaxle, suspension and steering, brakes, electrical and electronic systems, heating and air conditioning, and engine performance. Upon successful completion of these tests and two years of experience in the field, student becomes ASE Certified Master Automobile Technician.

The Building Trades courses provide competency-based instruction in the primary areas of carpentry, electricity, and plumbing. Students will interpret blueprints, frame building sections, apply basic electrical theory, install conductors, install panel boards and switchboards, perform pipe cutting, rough-in water distribution components, and install fixtures and trims. (Maximum Class Size of 20 students)

Basic Carpentry

This basic carpentry course covers topics on lumber, hand tools, and stationary and portable tools. The students will also build small projects designed to help them understand and master the tools and machines of the trade. This program will provide students with the knowledge needed to work in residential construction, and create relationships with other segments of the construction industry. (Maximum Class Size of 20 Students)

Building Trades

The Building Trades courses provide competency-based instruction in the primary areas of carpentry, electricity, and plumbing. Students will interpret blueprints, frame building sections, apply basic electrical theory, install conductors, install panel boards and switchboards, perform pipe cutting, rough-in water distribution components, and install fixtures and trims. (Maximum Class Size of 20 Students)

Computer Network Management

This course teaches students the skills needed to obtain entry-level home network installer jobs. It also helps students develop some of the skills needed to become network technicians, computer technicians, cable installers, and help-desk technicians. It provides a hands-on introduction to networking and the internet, using tools and hardware commonly found in home and small business environments.

Computer Systems Technology

Students learn to construct, troubleshoot, service, and repair computer systems, related components, and software, and install and maintain local area networks.

Cosmetology

Cosmetology is the study of hair, skin, and nails and their related care. Students study and prepare in a clinical lab setting, using mannequins and live models for manipulative skill practice. The program emphasizes safety and sanitation, communication, and management skills. Related areas of study include psychology, ethics, and presentation of a professional image. Competency completions prepare the student for the Virginia Board of Cosmetology licensing exam. (Maximum Class Size of 20 Students)

Criminal Justice 

Students learn the theory, principles, and techniques of developing, administering, and managing services for the safety and protection of people and property.

Culinary Arts 

Students are prepared for job entry at the semi-skilled level for food service occupations. Instructional areas include nutrition, handling and storing of food, sanitation, and the microbiology of food spoilage. Completion of this course prepares students for a certification examination. (Maximum Class Size of 20 Students)

Drafting 

Students learn theory and the manipulative skills necessary to produce complete and accurate drawings based on the ideas and sketches of engineers, architects, and designers. They design and prepare mechanical, structural, and architectural plans, electronics, transmitters, power supplies, and receivers relevant to consumer electronic products as they practice electronic product troubleshooting, servicing and safety procedures.

Introduction to Health and Medical Sciences

This course introduces the student to all health care careers and develops basic skills common to all health and medical sciences. It is recommended as the first course for the following occupational offerings: Practical Nursing I HMS 8357, Nursing Assistant I HMS8360.

Licensed Practical Nursing

Open to seniors and adults – anatomy and physiology, drug therapy, nutrition, medications, menial health, geriatrics and medical surgical nursing. Clinical setting – licensure upon satisfactory score on NCLEX exam – may qualify for Virginia Highlands Community College “bridge” program and complete RN program one year after graduation.

Masonry

Students learn to use hand tools such as trowels, levels, and chisels and power tools such as concrete mixers to lay brick, concrete block, tile, and related materials. (Maximum Class Size of 20 Students)

Medical Terminology 

Medical Terminology is designed to help students learn health care language and is presented in logical order, beginning with each body system's anatomy and physiology and progressing through pathology, diagnostic procedures, therapeutic interventions, and finally pharmacology. Medical concepts, terms, and abbreviations are also presented to the students.

Nurse's Aide

Classroom and clinical instruction in patient care in hospitals, nursing homes, and home health care facilities. Certification upon completion of program and success on State Board Exam.

Pharmacy Technician

This program would prepare students for job entry as a pharmacy technician or as a springboard for further education in the pharmacy field. Instructional areas include assisting the pharmacist in serving patients, maintaining medication and inventory control systems, and participating in the administration and management of pharmacy practice. Completion of the program prepares students for the pharmacy technician certification.

Welding

Students learn to use gases and/or welding processes and to braze and solder metal parts according to diagrams, blueprints, or written specifications. The program is certified by SENSE, allowing students to prepare for the Level I certification exam for welding. (Maximum Class Size of 20 Students)

The Washington County School board is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination with regard to race, color, sex, age, religion, disability, national origin, gender, ethnicity, ancestry, marital status in its programs and activities and provides equal access to the Boy Scouts and other designated youth groups. The Washington County School Board has designated the Manager of Human Resources, Supervisor of Special Services, or Supervisor of CTE as the designated compliance officers. Contact information for the compliance officers is 812 Thompson Drive, Abingdon, Virginia 24210. The phone number is 276-739-3000.